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Financial planning

Investing in Business Property Loans: two case studies

We haven’t published a case study for a while, so here are two that will provide an overview of the borrowers and loans you’re investing in.

Financial planning

Investing in mortgages - Business Property Loan No.1: a case study

As mentioned in our first case study, we’re providing some case studies of our borrowers and this time we’ll look at one of our Business Property Loans, the second new investing class on the Squirrel platform returning 5% p.a.

Financial planning

Investing in Mortgages – Home Loan No.1: a case study

As part of our ongoing commitment to transparency for our investors, we're sharing a couple of case studies about the type of lending we are doing in our new investing classes: Home Loans and Business Property Loans. We were confident in approving these loans and what their characteristics are, and by sharing this we hope to pass some of that peace of mind to our investors.

Financial planning

P2P Investor update – heading into week 2 of lockdown

It’s day 12 of the Covid-19 lockdown in New Zealand. The world is still feeling uncertain and whilst we don't have a crystal ball, what we can do is give complete transparency about how our P2P platform is doing.

Financial planning

We're opening the door for retail investors

When one door closes, another opens. Whilst other p2p lenders in the NZ market may be reducing opportunities for retail investors, Squirrel are doing quite the opposite. We're adding to the investment opportunities through our p2p platform and improving our processes overall.

Financial planning

P2P Investors: How rollover loans work with your investment

We’ve started seeing our first tranche of Homeowners loans roll onto principal and interest after their initial 12-month term on interest only. Here's how they work with your investments.

Lifestyle and Technology

Borrowing without the bank

Consumers typically don’t pay off their credit cards each month. With a $15,000 balance and an average rate of 21%, it costs $3,000 a year in interest ($250 per month in interest alone.) But most people don’t see that because it is a revolving debt that goes up and down.